Diploma In Interior Design

Wishlist Share
Share Course
Page Link
Share On Social Media

About Course

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION
SEMESTER I
ICID 101: COMMUNICATION SKILLS
(2 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 24 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to provide the student with practically grounded knowledge and
skills to help them process and present information.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the course, the learner should be able to:
1. Express their thoughts clearly and persuasively through basic rhetorical principles of
written and spoken communication;
2. Study effectively through relevant reading strategies
3. Exhibit integrity, credibility, self-confidence in presentation skills for academic and
professional endeavours.
4. Identify and select reading materials available in the university library and other
academic resources.
5. Document Academic sources effectively based on relevant citation styles
Course Description
Introduction to organizational and technical Communication; the communication process,
purpose and levels of communication, communication models, communication barriers and
principles of effective communication. Writing Skills; pre-writing techniques, process of
academic writing, critical thinking in writing, argumentation, utilizing sources of information,
the Research /Term paper, documentation of sources. Functional communication; writing
business letters, writing CVs and resumes, job hunting and interview skills, writing reports,
journals, project proposals, writing the research project. Reading Skills; nature of the reading
process, importance of reading skills, types of reading sources, elements of a good text,
difficulties in processing a text, poor reading habits, effective psycho-motor reading skills,
word-attack and text attack skills. Information science; the role of information in academic
work, types of information and resources, methods of accessing information and resources in
academic libraries, how information is organized, practicum on locating information
materials. Public speaking and oral Presentation Skills; the power of speech, stages in
planning a speech, developing self- confidence and self-control, exhibiting integrity and
credibility, , exhibiting rhetorical sensitivity appropriate use of visual aids in presentation,
utilizing word-power vocal attributes and body language for effective delivery, active
listening skills and strategies, writing a speech for a multicultural and international audience
and practicing some notable speeches
References
1. Afoloyan, A &Newsum, H.E. (1986) The use of English communication skills for
University Students- London Longman.
2. Guffey, M. E., & Loewy, D. (2010). Business communication: Process and product.
Cengage Learning.
3. HuckinN.T ,and Olsen L.A (1991) — Technical writing and professional
communication — McGraw Hill
4. Muchiri, M. (1993) Communication Skills. Nairobi Longman.
5. Mutua, R.W., (1992) Study and Communication Skills, London the Macmillan Press
Limited.
6. Okombo, 0. (1990) A student guide to writing and study skills .Nairobi. Nairobi
University Press.
7. Peter, C.B. (1996) A guide to academic writing Eldoret Zapf Chancery.
ICID 103: INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR DESIGN
(2 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 24 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of this course is to enable the student to identify the seven layers of interior.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to identify and apply the following layers in
an interior working and living space:
1. Paint & Architecture
2. Installed Flooring
3. Upholstered Furniture
4. Accent Fabrics
5. Non-upholstered Furniture
6. Accessories
7. Plants & Lighting
Course Content
Introductory overview of the seven layers of design; Paint & Architecture, Installed Flooring,
Upholstered Furniture, Accent Fabrics, Non-upholstered Furniture, Accessories, and Plants &
Lighting
References
1. Ireland, J. (2009). History of interior design. Oxford: Berg.
2. Massey, A. (2008) Interior Design since 1900, 3rd ed. London: Thames and Hudson
3. Pile, J.F. (2000). A history of interior design. New York: Wiley.
4. Rolshoven, M. (2005). New furniture design. Koln: Daab.
5. Stratton, A. (2004). Form and design in classic architecture. Mineola, N.Y: Dover
Publications.
ICID 105: ERGONOMICS AND ANTHROPOMETRICS
(2 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 24 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of this course is to enable the students to understand the relationship between
the human form and the environment.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course, the student will be able to:
1. Relate anthropometric dimensions of the human figure to space and task.
2. Classify workgroups for performance, movement, proportion and function.
3. Measure physiological and psychological dimensions.
Course Content
Human relationship with the physical environment. Sensory perception. Anthropometrics:
performance, movement, proportion, growth and body function in relation to the
environment. Shelter and comfort requirement. Thermal, acoustic and lighting considerations.
Analysis of the anthropometrics: physiological and psychological dimensions. The
implications of attendant factors on ambience and noise level in human environments at
micro and macro levels: effects on human habitat. Textile and clothing: residential, and
industrial. Anthropometrics: product design.
References
1. Best, K. (2010). The fundamentals of design management. La Vergne, TN: Ingram
Publisher Services.
2. Bridger, R. S., (2008) Introduction to ergonomics. 3rd ed. Boca Raton: CRC Press.
3. Bueno, P. (2003). Design furniture. Barcelona: Atrium Group.
4. Maina, S. M. (2007) Introduction to ergonomics. Nairobi: Frajopa Printers Mall.
5. Oborne, D.J. (1982). Ergonomics at work. London: Wiley.
6. Singleton, W.T. (1972). Introduction to ergonomics. Geneva: World Health
Organization.
ICID 107: RESEARCH METHODS I
(2 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 24 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of this course is to equip students with theoretical knowledge, skills and
techniques necessary to write a research proposal and the design research project.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Discuss different research methods.
2. State the problem, objectives, research questions hypothesis and tools of analysis.
3. Conduct a scientific inquiry using both qualitative and quantitative methods.
4. Develop research questions, hypothesis and data collection instruments.
5. Develop a research proposal.
Course Content
Understanding of design and social research proposal. Key concepts of social research,
identifying area and research topic in design. Scientific inquiry: including question
formulation. Identification of parameters. Pure and applied research using a broad range of
methodologies. Selection of appropriate methodological tools with emphasis on formative
research to answer design related questions: use of quantitative and qualitative methodologies
to inform research design, data collection, analysis and presentation. Ethical considerations.
Developing a research proposal.
References
1. Booth, W.C., Colomb, G.G., and Williams, J.M. (1995). The craft of research.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
2. Creswell, J.W. (2003). Research design: qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method
approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
3. DePoy, E. and Gitlin, L. N. (2005). Introduction to research: understanding and
applying multiple strategies. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.
4. Marczyk, G.R., DeMatteo, D., and Festinger, D. (2005). Essentials of research design
and methodology. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.
5. Welman, C., Kruger, F., Mitchell, B., and Huysamen, G.K. (2005). Research
methodology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
ICID 109: FREEHAND DRAWING I
(4 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 48 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of this course is to provide the student with basic drawing and compositional
skills.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Identify and use required drawing tools and materials
2. Acquire drawing techniques.
3. Translate three-dimensional subject matter into two-dimension.
4. Employ the principles of composition to create works of art and design.
Course Content
Line drawing skills; Drawing line using artistic media, tools and materials. Physical
characteristics and properties of lines: measure, type, direction, location and character.
Emotional and expressive properties of line. Line in relation to other art elements: shape,
texture, colour. Visual characteristics of line in creation of value, contrast, dimension, space,
emphasis and order. Simple landscapes, still life and objects. Tools and materials: chalk,
pencil, charcoal, crayons, paint, paper and various surfaces.
References
1. Afflerbach, F. (2014). Freehand drawing. Basel: Birkhauser.
2. Beakley, G. C. (1982). Freehand drawing and visualization. Indianapolis: BobbsMerrill
3. Cook, H. (1965). Freehand Technical Sketching. London: Methuen.
4. Evans, P. and Thomas, M. (2008). Exploring the elements of design. Clifton Park:
New York.
5. Laseau, P. (2004). Freehand sketching: an Introduction. New York: Norton.
ICID 111: TECHNICAL DRAWING I
(4 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 48 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to provide the student with knowledge and skills in
instrumental drawing.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Understand the general projection theory, with emphasis on orthographic projection.
2. Dimension and annotate drawings.
3. Apply technical drawing skills to studio projects.
Course Content
Development of skills in drawing and manipulation of 2D, 3D and other forms using
technical drawing instruments. Principles of instrumental drawing: line drawing, tone,
texture, scale, proportion, measurement and dimensions. Principles of orthographic drawing:
1- and 2-point perspective. Technical and skilful use of instruments to render drawings that
solve design problems.
References
1. Bowers, J. (1999). Introduction to two-dimensional design: understanding
form and function. New York: Wiley.
2. Cook, H. (1965). Freehand Technical Sketching. London: Methuen.
3. Frederick, G. E., Hill, I.L. and Dygdon, J.T. (1980). Technical Drawing, 7th
ed. New York: Macmillan.
4. Goetsch, D.L., Chalk, W., and Nelson, J.A. (2000). Technical drawing. 4th ed.
Albany, NY: Delmar publishers.
5. Sell, P. (1991). Basic technical drawing. New York: Merrill.
ICID 113: COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN
(4 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 48 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of this course is to impart knowledge on new developments in computer aided
design applications and technologies.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Apply the computer as a tool for design.
2. Draw two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) virtual models on the
computer.
3. Identify CAD hardware and demonstrate knowledge of 2D raster and vector software.
4. Demonstrate varied modeling techniques.
5. Apply rapid prototyping and rapid manufacturing techniques.
Course Content
Creation of 2D and 3D virtual models of products for the purposes of testing. New
developments in Computer Aided Design (CAD) applications and technologies with respect
to the design profession. Relating CAD to design specialization areas of Interior, introducing
specific software developed for each area. Introducing CAD as a major driving force for
research in computer graphics and design in general. Application of computers as a tool for
design. Advanced knowledge of two-dimensional raster and vector-based programs.
Construction of three-dimensional geometry in a virtual context. Advanced knowledge of
CAD hardware and software. Elements of CAD system. Geometric modelling. Advanced
3D modelling. Wireframe modelling. Solid modelling. Constructive solid geometry. Surface
modelling. Methods of surface construction. Surface of revolution. Role of CAD in design.
Application of Rapid prototyping and Rapid manufacturing.
References
1. Lumgair, C. (1999). Creative Design with your computer. London: Hodder &
Stoughton.
2. Reid, G. W. (1987). Landscape graphics. New York: Whitney Library of Design.
3. Song, J. and Yu, C. (2012). Computer aided design: technology, types, and practical
applications. New York: Nova Publishers.
4. Wilhide, E. and Design Museum. (2010). How to design a chair. London: Conran
Octopus.
5. Wong. W. (1972). Principles of two-dimensional design. New York: Van Nostrand
Reinhold Co. Press.
6. Zagar, S.A.A. (1977). Graphics publishing for visual communication. Nairobi: East
African Literature Bureau.
SEMESTER II
ICID 102: RESEARCH METHODS II
(2 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 24 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to enable the student develop a research project proposal that
will guide the final year project.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Write a research project proposal.
2. Evaluate and deploy different methods of collecting data.
3. Analyze, interpret and present their research and data findings.
Course Content
Developing a research project proposal; identifying a researchable issue/design problem.
Conducting research; setting objectives, conceptual framework, evaluating and deploying
different methods of collecting data, literature review, developing research questions, data,
collection and analysis, ethical issues, Research project paper writing on a design
issue/problem.
References
1. Booth, W.C., Colomb, G.G., and Williams, J.M. (1995). The craft of research.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
2. Cranz, G. and Pavlides, E. (2013) Environmental Design Research: the body, the city
and the buildings in between. San Diego, CA: Cognella Academic Publishing.
3. Creswell, J.W. (2003). Research design: qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method
approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
4. DePoy, E. and Gitlin, L. N. (2005). Introduction to research: understanding and
applying multiple strategies. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.
5. Marczyk, G.R., DeMatteo, D., and Festinger, D. (2005). Esssentials of research
design and methodology. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.
6. Welman, C., Kruger, F., Mitchell, B., and Huysamen, G.K. (2005). Research
methodology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
ICID 104: DESIGN PROFESSIONAL PRACTISE
(2 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 24 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to enable the student apply advanced knowledge and skills
essential in running and managing a design practice.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Acquire the basic knowledge and skills of managing a professional practice.
2. Relate effectively with clients, suppliers and production on any design project.
3. Project budgets, draft contracts and financially manage a design practice.
Course Content
Establishment and maintenance of design practice as a business venture. Organization and
legal structures, design management techniques, office management; strategic marketing of
design practice, business plans, market research, project budgets, contracts, productivity and
profitability, Financial Management, insurance, employee relations, taxation, Designer-client
relationship and consultation, working with contractors and suppliers, professional practice
and ethics.
References
1. Bachner, J.P. (1991). Practice management for design professionals: a practical
guide to avoiding liability and enhancing profitability. New York: Wiley.
2. Burstein, D. and Stasiowski, F. (1982). Project management for the design
professional. New York: Whitney Library of Design.
3. Coleman, C. (2002). Interior design handbook of professional practice. New York:
McGraw-Hill.
4. Coleman, C. (2010). Interior design practice. New York: Allworth Press.
5. Piotrowski, C. M. (2002). Professional practice for interior designers. New York: J.
Wiley.
6. Smyth, H. (2011). Managing the professional practice in the built environment.
Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
ICID 106: LANDSCAPE DESIGN
(4 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 48 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the elements of landscaping.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Identify appropriate plants and rocks for different landscapes.
2. Discuss landscaping features.
3. Design a landscape displaying structural elements and accessories.
Course Content
Knowledge of plants and rocks. Landscaping features: walls, fences. Principles of designing,
planting, and retaining walls. Development of landscapes at micro level: structural elements.
Tools to design landscapes for small scale environments for interiors and exteriors.
Plantology: various types of plants, climatic requirements for upkeep, and reproduction of
plants. Materials and specification of structural elements and accessories. Space use. Site
planning and management. Environmental design concepts. Methods and techniques for
landscape development including details, layouts, construction drawings, specifications and
cost estimating procedures both in small and large scale.
References
1. Faulkner, D. (2007) Introduction to environmental design. Dubuque, IA: Kendall
Hunt Publishers.
2. Kilmer, O. and Kilmer, R. (2003). Construction drawings and details for interiors.
New York: John Wiley and Sons.
3. Motloch, J.L. (2001). Introduction to landscape design. New York: Wiley.
4. Rogers, E.B. (2003). Elizabeth Rodgers (2001) Landscape design: a cultural and
architectural history. New York, NY: Abrams.
5. Simmonds, J.O. and Starke, B.W. (2006) Landscape architecture: a manual of
environmental planning and design. New York: McGraw-Hill.
6. Wang, S. (2014). Landscape design. Hong Kong: Sandu Publishing Co., Ltd.
ICID 108: EXHIBITION AND DISPLAY DESIGN
(4 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 48 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the elements of exhibition and
display.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Identify the elements and principles of exhibition and display.
2. Select appropriate materials for exhibition and display
3. Design an exhibition space and
4. Provide the technical specs for exhibition and display.
Course Content
Organizing and managing design brief for small scale exhibitions. Window display for
products: jewellery, clothes, cosmetics, electronics and hardware equipment. Design and
development of large-scale exhibitions. International trade fairs. Industrial and commercial
displays and expositions. Production and studio techniques: modelling, considerations of
design production process, specifications, and dimensions of exhibits. Cost of exhibits and
exhibition systems. Portable and travelling exhibitions. Workshop considerations. Display
techniques of merchandise. Advanced illumination techniques. Different types of exhibits:
indoor and outdoor. Design finishing. Use of video slides. Application of computer graphics.
References
1. Bell, V.B. and Rand, P. (2014). Materials for Design 2. New York, NY: Princeton
Architectural Press.
2. Dernie, D. (2006). Exhibition Design. New York: W.W. Norton.
3. Dober, R.P. (1969). Environmental design. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
4. Feisner, E. A. (2001). Colour Studies. New York: Fairchild Publications.
5. Ralston, T., Foster, E., and Foster, J. (1985). How to display it: a practical guide to
professional merchandise display. New York: Art Direction Book Co.
6. Schittich, C. (2009). Exhibitions and displays: museum design concepts, brand
presentation, trade show design. Basel: Birkhuser.
7. Steeds, L. (2014). Exhibition. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.
ICID 110: FURNITURE & FURNISHING DESIGN
(4 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 48 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the elements of furniture design.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Identify features of furniture design, hard and soft furnishing.
2. Utilize the tools and equipment of furniture making.
3. Understand the lighting needs in selected interior spaces
4. Design and produce furniture and a space with furnishing and lighting elements.
Course Content
Production of furniture: measuring, joinery, grooving, cutting holes. Materials and
specifications: wood, fabrics, metals and recycled sources. Materials and techniques.
Workshop activities. Tools and equipment. Ergonomics application. Categories, trends and
styles of furniture design. Design of home: office, recreational and institutional furniture.
Contemporary and traditional forms of furniture. Presentation of furniture designs.
Hard furnishings: office accessories; indoor sculpture and art decorative elements. Paintings,
pictures, and electronics. Soft furnishings: fabrics, curtains, and voiles, scatter cushions,
upholstery, window blinds, window shutters. Rugs: art rugs, area rugs, carpet. Lighting:
introduction to lighting and its properties. Visual mechanisms: scotopic and photopic vision,
glare and control lighting units. Natural and artificial lighting, fluorescent and incandescent
design. Light design for specific areas: indoor, household, theatres, exhibitions, displays,
auditoriums, institutions. Highlights, spotlighting, special lighting effects, and illumination.
Outdoor light design: garden.
References
1. Bueno, P. (2003). Design furniture. Barcelona: Atrium Group.
2. Cranz, G. (1998). The chair: rethinking culture, body, and design. New York: W.W.
Norton.
3. Massey, A. (2011). Chair. London: Reaktion.
4. Postell, J.C. (2007). Furniture design. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.
5. Rolshoven, M. (2005). New furniture design. Koln: Daab.
6. Guthrie, P. (2004). Interior designer’s portable handbook. New York: McGraw-Hill.
7. Innes, M. (2012). Lighting for interior design. London: Laurence King Publishing.
8. Karlen, M. and Benya, J. (2004). Lighting design basics. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley.
9. Miller, J., Miller, M., Merrell, J., and Parker, F. (1989). Period design and furnishing.
New York: Crown Publishers.
10. Spilman, E.A. (1954). Soft furnishing. London. G. Bell.
ICID 112: INTERIOR SPACE DESIGN
(4 Hours per Week x 3 Months = 48 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the elements of interior architecture.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Discuss the history of interior architecture.
2. Analyze the spatial development of interior human environments.
3. Design an interior space displaying structural elements and accessories.
Course Content
Introduction to spatial analysis and development/human environment relations. Design on a
small scale. Commercial interiors. Special environment considerations. Unique design
functions: hospitals, restaurants, theatre. Contemporary interior design: local and indigenous.
Structural elements: windows, doors, staircases, railings, mezzanines and fixtures in relation
to acoustics and lighting. Interior decoration. Traditional and contemporary materials, tools
and equipment.
References
1. Coles, J., and House, N. (2007). The fundamentals of interior architecture. Lausanne:
AVA Academia.
2. Kurtich, J. and Eakin, G. (1993). Interior architecture. New York: Van Nostrand
Reinhold.
3. Leydecker, S. (2013). Designing interior architecture: concept, typology, material,
construction. Basel: De Gruyter.
4. Neufert, E and Neufert, P. (2012). Neufert architect’s data. West Sussex: WileyBlackwell.
5. Piotrwski, C. (2009). Becoming an interior designer. Hoboken: John Wiley and Sons.
SEMESTER III
ICID 114: INDUSTRIAL ATTACHMENT
(40 Hours per Week x 1 Month = 160 Hours)
Course Objectives
The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the practical work experience.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Identify features of the design work environment.
2. Work with a supervisor.
3. Engage in a real-world project.
Through industrial attachment, the student will gain invaluable practical experience in the
area of specialization, be exposed to the most current technology and business practices.
Gain hands on experience to reinforce what is learnt in the classroom and an opportunity to
understand the working environment setup. Work closely with the supervisor to realize the
objectives of the attachment, maintain a daily log of activities, engage in real world projects
and write reports.
References
1. Coleman, C. (2002). Interior design handbook of professional practice. New York:
McGraw-Hill.
2. Coleman, C. (2010). Interior design practice. New York: Allworth Press.
3. Dernie, D. (2006). Exhibition Design. New York: W.W. Norton.
4. Drpic, I. (1988). Sketching and rendering interior spaces. Oxford: Phaidon Press.
5. Guthrie, P. (2004). Interior designer’s portable handbook. New York: McGraw-Hill.
6. Piotrowski, C. M. (2002). Professional practice for interior designers. New York: J.
Wiley.
ICID 116: DESIGN RESEARCH PROJECT REPORT
(2 Hours per Day x 2 Weeks = 20 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to enable the student to develop a report as part of their final
year project.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Evaluate the design thinking concepts in relation to the project
2. Design the layout of the report to include images of sketches, working drawings,
prototypes and final products of the project
3. Produce a report for the executed final year project
Course Content
Write a research project report; Introduction, background, methodology, design process,
discussion, conclusion. Technical writing for design project reports; presenting design
outputs: visual data; layout and copy editing; Referencing; Avoiding plagiarism; Submitting
the report; University of Nairobi format for undergraduate reports.
References
1. Booth, W.C., Colomb, G.G., and Williams, J.M. (1995). The craft of research.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
2. Cranz, G. and Pavlides, E. (2013) Environmental Design Research: the body, the city
and the buildings in between. San Diego, CA: Cognella Academic Publishing.
3. Creswell, J.W. (2003). Research design: qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method
approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
4. DePoy, E. and Gitlin, L. N. (2005). Introduction to research: understanding and
applying multiple strategies. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.
5. Marczyk, G.R., DeMatteo, D., and Festinger, D. (2005). Esssentials of research
design and methodology. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons.
6. Welman, C., Kruger, F., Mitchell, B., and Huysamen, G.K. (2005). Research
methodology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
ICID 118: COMMERCIAL SPACE DESIGN PROJECT
(20 Hours per Week x 1 Month = 80 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to enable the student express a personal style in employing
advanced knowledge and skills in interior architecture to transform an interior space into a
habitable working environment.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Interpret design concepts and theories in relation to interior architecture
2. Produce unique interior architecture designs that express a personal style
3. Evaluate cultural concepts in interior architecture design
Course Content
Understanding of the user or buyer; Contemporary interior design – Local, indigenous
development, 20th Century high technology. Style and development; Structural elements –
windows, staircases, railings, Mezzanines and fixtures in relation to acoustics, lighting,
window, doors etc. Interior decorating traditional and contemporary materials, tools and
equipment. Introduction to facility management. Cultural concepts in interior architecture
design. Development of a portfolio.
References
1. Coles, J., and House, N. (2007). The fundamentals of interior architecture. Lausanne:
AVA Academia.
2. Guthrie, P. (2004). Interior designer’s portable handbook. New York: McGraw-Hill
3. Kurtich, J. and Eakin, G. (1993). Interior architecture. New York: Van Nostrand
Reinhold.
4. Leydecker, S. (2013). Designing interior architecture: concept, typology, material,
construction. Basel: De Gruyter.
5. Neufert, E and Neufert, P. (2012). Neufert architect’s data. West Sussex: WileyBlackwell.
6. Piotrowski, C. (2009). Becoming an interior designer. Hoboken: John Wiley and
Sons.
7. Piotrowski, C. M. and Rogers, E.A. (1999). Designing commercial interiors. New
York: Wiley.
ICID 120: RESIDENTIAL SPACE DESIGN PROJECT
(20 Hours per Week x 1 Month = 80 Hours)
Course Objective
The objective of the course is to enable the student express a personal style in employing
advanced knowledge and skills in interior architecture to transform an interior space into a
habitable living environment.
Expected Learning Outcomes
By the end of this course the student will be able to:
1. Interpret design concepts and theories in relation to interior architecture
2. Produce unique interior architecture designs that express a personal style
3. Evaluate cultural concepts in interior architecture design
Course Content
Understanding of the user or buyer; Contemporary interior design – Local, indigenous
development, 20th Century high technology. Style and development; Structural elements –
windows, staircases, railings, Mezzanines and fixtures in relation to acoustics, lighting,
window, doors etc. Interior decorating traditional and contemporary materials, tools and
equipment. Introduction to facility management. Cultural concepts in interior architecture
design. Development of a portfolio.
References
1. Coles, J., and House, N. (2007). The fundamentals of interior architecture. Lausanne:
AVA Academia.
2. Guthrie, P. (2004). Interior designer’s portable handbook. New York: McGraw-Hill
3. Kurtich, J. and Eakin, G. (1993). Interior architecture. New York: Van Nostrand
Reinhold.
4. Leydecker, S. (2013). Designing interior architecture: concept, typology, material,
construction. Basel: De Gruyter.
5. Neufert, E and Neufert, P. (2012). Neufert architect’s data. West Sussex: WileyBlackwell.
6. Piotrowski, C. (2009). Becoming an interior designer. Hoboken: John Wiley and
Sons.
7. Piotrowski, C. M. and Rogers, E.A. (1999). Designing commercial interiors. New
York: Wiley.

Show More
Scroll to Top
× Chat us on Whatsapp